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Food, Inc. movie
erick Posted at 2009/06/24 10:57am reply to

erick
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Food, Inc. looks like an interesting movie. Though it doesn't look like it argues for veganism, it does argue for consumers to be more aware of the choices they make in regards to food. It opens in Austin June 26. We should plan an event to see it some time.
http://www.foodincmovie.com/

The Austin Chronicle has a write up:
http://www.austinchronicle.com/gyrobase/Issue/story?oid=oid%3A795109


BeccaGreenIsland Posted at 2009/06/28 2:49pm reply to

BeccaGreenIsland
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I just saw Food Inc last night! Its soooooo sooo good! I'm so glad a movie like this has made it to mainstream theatres and attracted mainstream attention and movie-goers, although you're right its not mainly an animal rights movie or pro-vegan movie (it does not discuss the health implications of eating animal products in general) though it does mention a few times that americans eat way too much, but what it does do mainly is make people aware of where their food comes from and how mega corporations have taken over everything including our food supply and put profits above everything else. It does show some very convincing footage of slaughterhouses and animal abuse without any commentary so in a way it does include the animal rights issues.

My omnivore ex-bf ending up watching it with me and said afterwards it changed his life and he is going to change his ways, he didn't come out and say he would go vegan just yet but said he never wants to go hunting again and he only wanted to eat vegan food afterwards!! That's pretty powerful, there's a really powerful scene that shows a local organic 'more humane' farmer slaughtering and processing his chickens and it literally sounds like the chickens are screaming "ow, ow, ouch" like a human would and I think it made people realize that is the "humane" caring farmer and how he does it, it didn't even show the actual slaughter in the majority of slaughterhouses but showed plenty of before and afters that allow the viewer to piece it all together and imagine how horrible it really is, but above all I think it sends a message that we can no longer rely on our government, the FDA and USDA to protect us from harmful food or to tell us the truth about where it comes from, so people need to be their own advocates and seek out the truth independently and then try to buy mostly local organic foods and hopefully go vegan too
carrie Posted at 2009/06/28 3:04pm reply to

carrie
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I definitely have to see this movie. You know how at the Alamo they'll have a few temporary dishes and drinks on the menu that are themed with the current popular movies? Like Romulan Ale for Star Trek and Blood Shots for Drag Me to Hell? (Both tasty by the way) I think, am not positive, that they might be having a vegan dish to go with Food Inc. I didn't ask the server about the specifics, but the dish was organic vegetables over a quinoa salad or something. If that dish is vegan, then that might be a neat meetup idea.
BeccaGreenIsland Posted at 2009/06/28 3:21pm reply to

BeccaGreenIsland
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oh that sounds good Carrie, I saw it last night at the Arbor Hills Cinema but if Alamo did it with the vegan food that would be perfect! I almost wanted to yell out at the end of the movie to everyone "Go Veg!!" ha ha or start handing out business cards to be their personal vegan chef to try vegan food for a week!! ha ha I get a little excited sometimes but I could tell from peoples' reactions they were thinking about the animals alot during the movie even though it was not an animal rights movie, even just one scene of the cows all crammed together in the feedlots covered in manure and no where to move around created gasps and sighs of dis-belief from the audience, an older couple next to us said "look at them, they can't even move around" and sounded horrified, so I think it created an animal rights/pro-vegan message unintentionally (or maybe it was carefully crafted into it without being too loud about it, it was co-written by the author of "ominvores dilemna" and the "fast food nation" guy, I wonder if they are vegan??
deleted Posted at 2009/06/28 8:57pm reply to

deleted
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>it was co-written by the author of "ominvores dilemna" and the "fast food nation" guy, I wonder if they are vegan??

They are not, one of the scenes from the Food Inc. shows Eric Schlosser (fast food nation) eating a burger. And Mark Pollan (Omnivores) eats meat as well.

Nonetheless, they are doing something to make people more conscious of their food intake, which hopefully will lead to more enlightenment.

I went from eating whatever, to free range meat and no fast food to veggie to vegan over a course of a few years, so I hope this movie will spark the same type of interest.

It was a really good movie though, and though it doesn't really touch directly on veg life, it will open some eyes, hopefully some hearts and then some minds.
Gabriel Posted at 2009/06/29 9:48am reply to

Gabriel
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Yeah, from what I understand (without having read the book myself) the guy who wrote The Omnivore's Dilemma actually perpetuates some myths about vegetarianism.  Here is someone else's take that summarizes some of Pollan's anti-veg*n perspectives found in his book:

http://homemadevegan.wordpress.com/2008/06/30/a-response-to-the-omnivores-dillema-chapter-17-the-ethics-of-eating-animals/
Craig? Posted at 2009/06/29 9:57pm reply to

Craig?
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I saw it.  just wrote a very "Craig?" review.  Jill's shit-ass laptop went out and lost it all.  now I'm just pissed.

maybe I'll write another.  not now.  too soon.
HappyVegan Posted at 2009/07/02 10:48am reply to

HappyVegan
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Saw the movie last night.  There was a lady sitting next to me that ordered a hamburger.  When they were talking about the pigs and chickens, she pushed it aside, and said to her partner " ugh.. i think Im going vegetarian after this"  Really wanted to talk to her afterwards, but they left before the credits came up...  

carleywolf Posted at 2009/07/02 2:40pm reply to

carleywolf
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Yeah this was a great movie. Everyone should see it.
Amelia Posted at 2009/07/03 12:16am reply to

Amelia
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I saw this movie tonight, and although it was preaching to the converted, I hope it reaches more people happy

Also, Alamo has a "Food Inc." platter with local/organic veggies. I was expecting more food for the $10 price tag, especially because it only came with:
Two slices of tomato
Two slices fried sweet potato
Scoop of undercooked unspiced quinoa
Two figs
and a pastry filled with mushrooms topped with CHEESE
I was let down angry but I saved the pastry thing for my roommate & he liked it.
Teddy Grahams10 Posted at 2009/07/09 10:55am reply to

Teddy Grahams10
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"Chipotle sponsoring FREE nationwide screenings of Food, Inc. http://ow.ly/gNEv Austin on July 16 at Arbor Cinemas"

for those who haven't seen it... happy
Amelia Posted at 2009/07/09 10:21pm reply to

Amelia
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That's weird that Chipotle would be sponsoring it... aren't they part of McDonalds?
Ripe Tomato Posted at 2009/07/09 10:34pm reply to

Ripe Tomato
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They were bought out by McDonalds, but then McDonalds sold them, and now the company is really trying to brand themselves as an eco friendly natural food eatery.
Nobylspoon Posted at 2009/07/16 1:16pm reply to

Nobylspoon
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Anyone going to the free screening tonight?
carrie Posted at 2009/07/16 3:21pm reply to

carrie
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Alas, the So You Think You Can Dance results show is on tonight, and I can't miss that!
Diana Posted at 2009/07/24 10:22pm reply to

Diana
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Just saw Food Inc.. In a nutshell I thought it was shit, not absolute shit but nothing to write home about definitely. Am I the only person who thinks GMO is utterly oversensationalized? They've never been shown to hurt anyone aside from the farmers getting reamed by Monsanto and I (perhaps naively) have faith that a team of pro bono lawyers are going to step in at some point and set much of that right. Soy is the food that replaces meat in many people's diet and is what new vegetarians go to for comfort. All this villification of soy only minimizes the much more important problem of the way animals are treated in this country. After hearing an interview with the producer and director on NPR I'm led to believe the Monsanto story was easier to pursue than the meat industry stories. The Monsanto thing has been done to death in a handful of other documentaries.
Schlosser eating a burger in a suede jacket; gag me with a spoon.
And that Stoneybrook farm hippie "Like, capitalism is really bad mmkay except when I make a lot of money and then can bring down capitalism, like, eventually".
My favorite guy in the film was the farmer who grass fed the cattle, he was, at the very least honest and consistent, not afraid to get his hands dirty or look the animals he killed in the eye. The expose of Smithfield was another interesting tidbit. I guess the market has to be saturated with these films and this one has got a lot of press, for which I am grateful. But it's bittersweet as it seems to just scratch at the surface of the dark murky depths of Americans' ignorance.
weigand Posted at 2009/07/25 12:51am reply to

weigand
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Yes, GMO is not evil. Genetic modification is done with the goal of producing grain, fruits, and veggies that are resistant to drought, disease, and pests. Genes are also tweaked in such a way as to improve the nutritional profile of the food. That makes it a moral issue, because it means it saves lives. It makes it a vegan issue because it means you don't have to spray as much pesticide. It's a global warming issue, because it means it's more energy efficient. It's a humanitarian issue, because it means you need less labor for the same amount of food harvested, and money and manpower saved there can be invested in education.

On the downside, though, I understand there are risks. There are known risks and there are unknown risks. The number of genes being tweaked at any given time is actually very small. And most of the time scientists can predict exactly what effect it will have, because those genes come from other life which has been studied. It should be nearly impossible for a gene that has been studied well to be implanted and have such an adverse effect as causing cancer, liver damage, or birth defects in people, and it has never been shown to be the case with existing GMO foods, to my knowledge.

Also consider the fact that farmers have been continuously altering the genomes of all cultivated crops since prehistoric days.  We do this by selection.  We also cross-pollinate and make hybrids.  This method of genetic manipulation results in altering a large percentage of genes.  It's much more heavy-handed than modern GMO methods which only modify a very few number of genes at any given moment. Theoretically therefore, it should be relatively more risky. Yet, because it's "natural", people don't have a problem with it.

So, yes there are risks, but I don't think fear should win out.  I think careful scientific study should be used. There will likely be problems created and accidents will happen, but the benefits outweigh those risks in my opinion.

Now cue the inevitable mass anti-GMO chanting.  Hehe.

- Steve
Gabriel Posted at 2009/07/25 4:00pm reply to

Gabriel
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Diana wrote:
"Schlosser eating a burger in a suede jacket; gag me with a spoon.
And that Stoneybrook farm hippie "Like, capitalism is really bad mmkay except when I make a lot of money and then can bring down capitalism, like, eventually".
My favorite guy in the film was the farmer who grass fed the cattle, he was, at the very least honest and consistent, not afraid to get his hands dirty or look the animals he killed in the eye. The expose of Smithfield was another interesting tidbit. I guess the market has to be saturated with these films and this one has got a lot of press, for which I am grateful. But it's bittersweet as it seems to just scratch at the surface of the dark murky depths of Americans' ignorance."

Diana, I agree with you about Schlosser and also about the Stonyfield Farm guy.  However, the guy who was "the good guy" in the movie disturbed me immensely.  I think he is frightening with how he can care so much in one way and yet engage in such horrific acts.  He had the ability to look at what was going on in factory farms and say that was wrong and seemed very passionate about it, but then he would dispassionately kill chickens like he was shucking corn.  He was not at all perturbed by what he was doing.  He was articulate, intelligent, and seemed somewhat compassionate (at times).  But then, his killing of the chickens was horrible and cruel.  Somehow he dichotomized what he does and what the factory farmers do, when the end result in both cases is unnecessary suffering and cruelty. Ironically, he seemed more disconnected to me than those who didn't care about anything but profit.  They were much more consistent and honest in my mind.  I think seeing his slaughter of the chickens will create more vegetarians than anything else I saw in this film.  I don't believe most people can honestly look at that and think that it's humane.  It turns the notion of "happy meat" on its head.  That is one of the reasons I am recommending the documentary.
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