Recipes

Starting to separate
Starting to separate

Separated
Separated

Spooning
Spooning

Putting curds in the press
Putting curds in the press

Weighing it down
Weighing it down

Uncovered
Uncovered

In hand
In hand

Cooked
Cooked

Recipes :: entrees - appetizers - desserts - miscellaneous
DIY Tofu! posted by Ross

Ingredients:

So, what you will need:

64 Fl. oz. Homemade soymilk or commercially bought soymilk(I can't vouch for the commercially made soymilk, as I'm not sure if their additives make it harder to coagulate. But seems like it should work, let me know if you try it.) which will make about 1 lb. of tofu.

Tofu Press
Cheesecloth
Nigari or Calcium Sulfate
Warm water
Sieve or holy spoon

Directions:

So here's my visual guide to making homemade tofu. If you've been keeping track of other posts I've made, you know that I recently bought a wooden tofu press from soyajoy(same place my soymilkmaker is from). It's very cheaply made and it definitely wasn't worth 30 bucks(but hey, it did come with nigari to make the tofu, worth 10 bucks itself). All you need is some sort of small box with holes that you want your tofu to take the shape of, just rectangular and have an open top.

My big problem with getting this going was that the instructions I got with the press were quite vague and left things very open as to how to do them. I could find no guides with pictures so I finally just was like, screw it, I'll jump in. So there we go, the first time I did it, the whole process took me about 45 mins. Now I can do it in about 20-25 mins.

I did a cost analysis last night and was amazed that it costs only about $ .26 per lb. of organic homemade tofu. Good deal, ey?

So, to start!

Heat up the soymilk in a big pot, I usually put it on high to hurry up the process. Then mix between 1/2 to 1 tsp. of nigari with 1/2 to 1 cup(accordingly) of warm water, and dissolve the nigari in the water.

When the soymilk is just about boiling, reduce heat to medium/low-medium and slowly start pouring in the nigari solution, cutting the water back and forth with a spoon/spatula(not full throttle stirring). Add a bit, cut the water, add a bit, cut the water.

Note: the speed with which you add the nigari affects whether the curdled soybeans will clump together in big clumps, or whether they will just be in tiny bits(faster the former, and slower the latter).

So you will eventually start to see little bits of soybean separating

Keep up this process until about 3/4 of the nigari solution is used. Then stop stirring, and let it sit for 2-3 mins. unstirred.

Then continue to add the remaining 1/4 solution in the same manner. This is when you will likely see the most change happen. Continue stirring and the curd will separate from the amber liquid more and more.

If there are still milky areas then you may have to add more solution to get it all, but if it's generally just sort of hazy then you're okay.

From this point you can use either a spoon with holes in it or a sieve(make sure holes aren't too big for the curd to fall through) and either spoon out the curds into a cheesecloth lined tofu press, or strain the curds and then put it in the press. The press should be in a container (like the big pot I've got in these pictures) that will hold the water pressed while the tofu sits. Then cover the top of the curds with the cheesecloth and place something flat on top of the curds within the press box along with a weight of about a jar filled with water(heavier if you want the tofu pressed more finely together, experiment. i used a pressure cooker in these pictures, which was waaay too much. it made the tofu really smooth and dense though, which was nice. but i like fluffy tofu better).

Leave it for 15 mins.

Then take off the weight, and unwrap the tofu! it's ready to go, if you're ready to cook it already, go for it. It's very nice fresh, or stick it in a container covered with water and let it sit out of the fridge until cool, then put it in the fridge.


add comment
0 users logged in: